If the other parent moves to another country with their child, it is often important to use Skype or other video chat services to keep in touch. In order for the contacts to be implemented over a greater distance, it is often particularly important to have the support of the parent with whom the child lives, so that the child can be reached at the agreed times and the implementation can be carried out without disturbance, and the child can chat with the absent parent without prejudice. Misunderstandings quickly arise and the question arises as to how the parent who is taking care of the child can be required to fulfil his or her obligation to provide support, which is regulated by the courts.

In a case in which the mother had moved to Ireland with the child, the Federal Court of Justice decided that the family court in Germany also had international jurisdiction to set administrative fines to enforce the contact arrangements made at the family court in Germany. Here the Federal Court of Justice refers to the assessment of the European Court of Justice, which assumes an accessory jurisdiction of the court in the state of origin (Urteil des Europäischen Gerichtshofs vom 9. September 2015; C-4/14).

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